Thursday, January 23, 2020

Analysis of Stolls Essay, On Classrooms, With and Without Computers :: Education Teaching

Analysis of Stoll's Essay, On Classrooms, With and Without Computers Clifford Stoll's essay "On Classrooms, with and without Computers" discusses the role computers play in the modern classroom. Although the theme is not directly stated at the beginning of the piece, it soon becomes apparent that Stoll believes that computers do not have the ability to give a person, especially a child, a complete education because "only human beings can teach the connections between things." He uses a style of asking questions and then answering them himself, which works well because it causes the reader to think about the topic before Stoll presents his own argument. It also keeps the essay organized, although it makes the text seem choppy at times. His tone is educated, though sometimes sarcastic. The audience that he writes for would likely be parents, teachers, and other people concerned about quality education; and they are also likely to be fairly educated people themselves. The essay is based on the warrant that computers have inherent limitations that should not be ignored. In order to support his claim of fact, Stoll uses three ideas. The first support claim questions the value of the information the children are receiving from computers. An example Stoll uses is a Computer-Using Educators conference when a speaker pointed out the amount of research a computer can generate. One teacher remarked that the printed pages were worthless in a classroom without a great deal of sorting and working. Audience members unfamiliar with computers would sympathize with this situation, although a technologically advanced group might be experienced enough to cut down on extra work. Either way, it implies that more precise methods might work better. Stoll's second support claim discusses how people view computers. In American school systems computer classes are replacing other classes like home economics and drivers education. Logical thinkers would be persuaded that emphasis on computers is shortsighted. When David Thornburg, director of the Computer-Using Educators conference, says that soon students will not need to use library because of the information they can get at home on the Internet, Stoll expresses disbelief at the notion. Educated people accustomed to learning in several different ways would agree with the idea that there is more to learning than this one resource. Stoll also uses the learning styles of children to support his claim. There is a physical side of education that cannot be simulated on screen, and a persuasive point that he makes is that by encouraging inquisitiveness in all of the areas of education children will have a broader basis on which to learn. Analysis of Stoll's Essay, On Classrooms, With and Without Computers :: Education Teaching Analysis of Stoll's Essay, On Classrooms, With and Without Computers Clifford Stoll's essay "On Classrooms, with and without Computers" discusses the role computers play in the modern classroom. Although the theme is not directly stated at the beginning of the piece, it soon becomes apparent that Stoll believes that computers do not have the ability to give a person, especially a child, a complete education because "only human beings can teach the connections between things." He uses a style of asking questions and then answering them himself, which works well because it causes the reader to think about the topic before Stoll presents his own argument. It also keeps the essay organized, although it makes the text seem choppy at times. His tone is educated, though sometimes sarcastic. The audience that he writes for would likely be parents, teachers, and other people concerned about quality education; and they are also likely to be fairly educated people themselves. The essay is based on the warrant that computers have inherent limitations that should not be ignored. In order to support his claim of fact, Stoll uses three ideas. The first support claim questions the value of the information the children are receiving from computers. An example Stoll uses is a Computer-Using Educators conference when a speaker pointed out the amount of research a computer can generate. One teacher remarked that the printed pages were worthless in a classroom without a great deal of sorting and working. Audience members unfamiliar with computers would sympathize with this situation, although a technologically advanced group might be experienced enough to cut down on extra work. Either way, it implies that more precise methods might work better. Stoll's second support claim discusses how people view computers. In American school systems computer classes are replacing other classes like home economics and drivers education. Logical thinkers would be persuaded that emphasis on computers is shortsighted. When David Thornburg, director of the Computer-Using Educators conference, says that soon students will not need to use library because of the information they can get at home on the Internet, Stoll expresses disbelief at the notion. Educated people accustomed to learning in several different ways would agree with the idea that there is more to learning than this one resource. Stoll also uses the learning styles of children to support his claim. There is a physical side of education that cannot be simulated on screen, and a persuasive point that he makes is that by encouraging inquisitiveness in all of the areas of education children will have a broader basis on which to learn.

Tuesday, January 14, 2020

Is Monopoly Necessarily Less Efficient Than Perfect Competition?

Is Monopoly necessarily less efficient than Perfect Competition According to SJ Grant’s Introductory Economics, Monopoly is the only sole supplier of the industry. They would not inherit any competitions as well as having no close substitutes. There are many reasons that cause the formation of Monopolists. Barriers to enter or exit discourages new firms to enter the market (patent rights creates a right to sell that product, abnormal profit, predatory pricing, raw material ownership, high fixed cost, government) being a price maker, firms either merge or get taken over by other firms and economies of scale.In Perfect competition, there are many sellers and buyers; there are only homogenous goods and perfect information. They are price takers so no firm charges either below or above the ruling market price. The demand curve is perfectly elastic. In this type of market, there is consumer sovereignty and advertisement could not be used to influence consumer’s demands. Howe ver both of them are opposite extreme forms of the market structure and in the realistic world, they hardly ever occur. An economist would define efficiency as ‘nothing can be made better off without causing the loss of another’.This is also known as Pareto efficiency. Meanwhile it is also when the resources are allocated in the best possible ways at the lowest possible average cost. Figure 1 Some people view Monopoly to be less efficient than perfect competition because they face no direct competition and so they would not work towards the interest of consumers. They would fail to apprehend productive efficiency using techniques and factors of production to produce at the lowest possible average cost per unit, because the cost of production is not a main concern to a Monopolist.They would simply increase price or restrict output. Monopolies are able to do that because they are price makers; even though the setting price is determined by the demand, they are still capab le of restricting output and increase the price. This demonstrated by figure 1 where the price is set against the AR curve rather than the MR. On the contrary, perfect competition means firms compete against each other: cost in this case is one of the main issues. The firms in that market would aim to produce at the lowest average cost because of the profit maximizing point, MR=MC.But in a perfect competitive market, the firms in the long run would only get normal profit so total revenue equals total cost. Figure 2 Monopolists are able to attain abnormal profit in the long run due to barriers to entry or exit. It illustrates that monopolies have market power and the downward sloping demand curve is one of the causes as shown in figure 2. The quantity and price which the monopolist selects is largely dependent on the marginal revenue and marginal cost. But the marginal revenue curve would always be lower than the demand curve.The reason for this can be illustrated by the figure 2; It shows that at any two random points and using the method of working out the total revenue (price X quantity), you would always get a negative gradient curve. Whilst differentiating the curve’s equation, you would always get the curve being below the demand curve. The quantity or price the firm chooses is based on the marginal revenue and marginal cost because, by increasing output, it causes two contrasting effects, price and quantity.The quantity effect is that by producing one more unit and it being sold, it increases the total revenue by the price that it is sold at. But producing more units, it decreases the price of the good and makes total revenue fall: this is the price effect. The price effect means that the marginal revenue will not be constant and so it would be below the demand curve. Consequently price effect would always occur if the monopolist increases quantity. However in a perfect competition, the MR equals AR: the firms being price takers, they can only acc ept the ruling market price.The AR curve is perfectly elastic because of consumer sovereignty. In figure 3, it shows that the firms only aim the price at the market demand; no firms would produce below the ruling market price because in the long run they would be earning a loss and eventually leave the market and in contrast, they would not set it above the market price because no consumers would buy from them when the goods are homogenous and other firms are there. Figure 3 Subsequently, with the MR curve always being below the demand curve, it causes the monopolist produce inefficiently.This is because all firms desires to produce the profit maximizing point, MR=MC and when the monopoly produces at that point, it will always produce at the point that is lower than the efficient level and so monopolies misallocate resources. Hence deadweight loss occurs and this can happen both in the long and short run as there are no competition pressure for them to become allocatively efficient. Allocative efficient is when P=MC where the cost reflects the price. Another point would be that unregulated monopoly can overcharge consumers as well as not allocating resource in a satisfactory manner.In a perfect competition market, firms are able to obtain allocatively efficient in the long run. Firms can misallocate in the short run due to them either earning abnormal profit or a loss but as soon as market competitions enhances firms to earn normal profit and produce efficiently, it becomes allocatively efficient. Barriers to entry prevent this discipline from market competition to happen to a monopolist and so they continue to misallocate resources. Figure 4 The idea of misallocation of resource closely links to the result of deadweight loss.Deadweight loss is the net loss where there is a loss of goods being produced for the price that consumer pay at. For figure 4, it shows that due to the price being charged against the D curve instead of MR=MC, this causes the area of the consumer surplus , when consumer pay less for the good they were willing to pay for, to decrease and the producer surplus, the amount gained from selling a good to increase. This suggests that the monopolist is X-inefficient as consumer loses out, producers gain from it.Furthermore it can be seen that there is an area of deadweight loss formed as well. Not all resources are used in the market. In comparison to perfect competition, figure 3, all the area above P1 is the consumer surplus and there is no deadweight loss, all the quantity produced is reflected towards to consumer demand. However Monopoly being less efficient than perfect competition is not always the case. The ability of economies of scale is a mass production of a good or when goods are distributed through network or grids (i. e. water supply).This makes the cost of production cheaper thus brings the price down. They are called Natural monopoly and they are more technically efficient. In figure 5, Pm from monopoly is lower than the price from smaller firms and more quantity is produced. If these goods are provided by smaller competitive firms, the cost would be greater leading to the goods being more expensive. Figure 5 Monopolies can earn abnormal profits in the long run means that they can use the profit to invest in research and development. This is known as dynamically efficient.They choose to invest for further development because it would make them become more efficient hence maintaining their market position and also to improve their differentiated goods making demand become more inelastic. In reality, Microsoft uses their profit and invests in the development area. They are a well established company and have customer loyalty due to the quality of their goods and the patent rights they impose. In contrast to perfect competition, firms would not be able to invest because they only earn normal profit.However it is not guaranteed that monopolist would make abnormal profit; it is also possib le that they only earn normal. In conclusion, through analyzing the efficiency in productive, allocative, technical and dynamical, monopoly is not necessarily less efficient than perfect competition. Although they can misallocate resources, resulting in deadweight loss, increase price or restrict output in order to gain profit there are other monopolies that are efficient like natural monopolies.One of the main reasons that monopolies produce less than the efficient level is because they lack competition pressure. If the firm is regulated by the government maybe it would act in the best interest of the society. However others may argue that because of the government, the monopoly is being protected by them. While monopolies is not always less efficient than perfect competition, most of the time is it and that is the reason governments regulate monopolies and prevent firms merging together or get taken over by.

Monday, January 6, 2020

Presidentail Power The State of the Union Speech Essays

Overseeing the action of the armed forces, appointing treaties to be drafted, managing national affairs and being a figurehead for a great nation all imply that the individual holding the title of President has a great amount of power at their disposal. There are those indviduals who automatically come to mind talking about the President, people like JFK, FDR and Abraham Lincoln, people who left a profound impact on the nation. Then there are the back burner Presidents who do not come to mind at all, individuals like Franklin Pierce and Benjamin Harrison, who did not seem to have anything significant happen during their time as president. Some Presidents seem to have been incredibly powerful while others appear t be there just a†¦show more content†¦In order to this, the President has to be able to balance the different interests of each group and be able to persuade them, not command them, to do what he wants or else it looks like weakness (Ellington). When FDR created the Works Progress Administration that gave jobs back to Americans, it was agreed upon and funded by Congress (Leuchtenburg). His ability to persuade them into taking that route to help the American public made him look more powerful in the eyes of the people because he was able to get his way and help them. This was in complete contrast to the time when Woodrow Wilson was unable to convince the Majority of Congress to ratify the treaty of Versailles because he was unwilling to compromise (Versailles). This in turn led to the Democrats losing the next election, a clear example of the loss of power. The ability of the President to be able to persuade other members of the government to pass plans that they come up with is one that clearly demonstrates their power and can make them seem even more powerful if they are able to successfully do it. Public opinion of a President affects how powerful they appear at the time. Some Presidents, like Ronald Regan were liked by a good number of people which helps them get more power because they had the support of the public. There is never a guarantee that one hundred percent of the people will like them, but a lot of people did like Regan during his presidency.

Sunday, December 29, 2019

About Sir Clough Williams-Ellis and Portmeirion, Wales

Architect Clough Williams-Ellis (May 28, 1883-April 9, 1978) is best known as the creator of Portmeirion, a village in Wales, yet as an environmentalist, he also helped establish the British National Parks system and became knighted for his services to architecture and the environment. Williams-Ellis was a master of illusion, and his designs confuse, delight, and deceive. Fast Facts: Clough Williams-Ellis Known For: Portmeirion Architect and EnvironmentalistBorn: May 28, 1883 in Gayton, Northamptonshire, England, U.K.Parents: Reverend John Clough Williams-Ellis and Harriet Ellen Williams-Ellis (nà ©e Clough)Died: April 9, 1978, Llanfrothen, Gwynedd, Wales, U.K.Education: Oundle School, with studies at Trinity College, Cambridge and the Architectural Association School of ArchitecturePublished Works:  England and the Octopus, On Trust for the NationAwards and Honors:  Military Cross in the 1918 New Year Honours; 1958 Commander of the Order of the British Empire; Knight Bachelor in the New Year Honours 1972Spouse:  Amabel StracheyChildren: Christopher Moelwyn Strachey Williams-Ellis, Susan Williams-EllisNotable Quote: Have nothing in your house that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful Early Life Young Bertram Clough first moved to Wales with his family when he was only four. He went back to England to study mathematics at Trinity College in Cambridge, but he never graduated. From 1902 to 1903 he trained at the Architectural Association in London. The budding designer had deep Welsh and English connections, being related to the medieval entrepreneur Sir Richard Clough (1530 to 1570) and the Victorian poet Arthur Hugh Clough (1819 to 1861). His first designs were numerous parsonages and regional cottages in England and Northern Ireland. He inherited some property in Wales in 1908, married in 1915, and raised a family there. After serving in World War I, he designed many war memorials and traveled to architecturally rich countries like Italy, an experience that informed his sense of what he wanted to build in his homeland. Portmeirion: A Lifelong Project In 1925, Williams-Ellis began building in Portmeirion in northern Wales. His work on  the resort village represented his efforts to prove that it was possible to build beautiful and colorful housing without defiling the natural landscape. Located on Williams-Ellis private peninsula on the coast of Snowdonia, Portmeirion first opened in 1926. Martin Leigh  / Getty Images Portmeirion was not a continuous project, however. He continued to design residences and designed the original summit building on Snowdon in 1935. Snowdon became the highest building in Wales. Portmeirion is riddled with anachronisms. Greek gods mingle with gilded figures of Burmese dancers. Modest stucco bungalows are decked with arcaded porches, balustraded balconies, and Corinthian columns. Its as though the designer tossed 5,000 years of architectural history along the shore, without a care for symmetry, accuracy, or continuity. Even American architect Frank Lloyd Wright paid a visit in 1956, just to see what Williams-Ellis was up to. Wright, who also boasted a Welsh heritage and a concern for conservation, praised the innovative combinations of architectural styles. The designer was 90 years old when  Portmeirion was completed in 1976. Highlights of Portmeirion The Piazza: Originally, the Piazza was a tennis court but since 1966, the area has been a quiet, paved area with a blue-tiled pond, a fountain, and lavish flower beds. Along the southern edge of the Piazza, two columns support gilded figures of Burmese dancers. A low stone stairway climbs to the Gloriette, a playful structure named after the grand monument at the Schà ¶nbrunn Palace near Vienna.Gloriette: Built in the mid-1960s, Portmeirions garden room or gloriette is not a building, but a decorative facade. Five trompe loeil windows surround the open doorway. The four columns, salvaged from the colonnade of Hooton Hall, Cheshire, are the work of 18th-century architect Samuel Wyatt.Bridge House: Built between 1958 and 1959, Bridge House seems larger than it is because of its tapering walls. When visitors pass through the archway from the parking area, they encounter their first breathtaking view of the village.Bristol Colonnade: Built in about 1760, the Colonnade  stood in front of a bathhouse in Bristol, England. It was falling into decay when Williams-Ellis moved the structure to Portmeirion piece by piece. In 1959, several hundred tons of delicate masonry were disassembled and transported to the Welsh village. Every stone was numbered and replaced according to precise measurements.Promenade: An assortment of urns and columns lines the flower-strewn Promenade atop the Bristol Colonnade built in the Welsh hillside overlooking The Piazza and the village. The integration of walkways atop, over, through, and into the village ties together the themes of community and harmony within Italian Renaissance architecture. The dome at the Promenades end replicates the famous Brunelleschi dome in Florence, Italy.Unicorn Cottage: In this miniature of a stately Chatsworth home, Williams-Ellis created the illusion of a classic Georgian estate. Elongated windows, long pillars, and an undersized gate make the Unicorn seem tall, but it is only a dressed-up bungalow built in the mid-1960s, only one story high.Hercules Gazebo: Several cast iron mermaid panels, salvaged from the Old Seamans Home in Liverpool, form the sides of the Hercules Gazebo. Built in 1961 and 1962, the Hercules Gazebo was painted shocking pink for many years. The structure is now a more subtle terracotta shade. But this playful facade is yet another example of architectural illusions, because the Gazebo disguises a generator and houses mechanical equipment.Chantry Cottage: Hotels and cottages dot the planned landscape of Portmeirion, just as they would in any village. Chantry Cottage, with red-clay, tile Italianate roof, sits high atop the hill, above the Bristol Colonnade and Promenade below. Built in 1937 for the Welsh painter Augustus John, Chantry Cottage is one of the earliest structures Williams-Ellis built and today is a self-catering cottage sleeping nine.Mermaid House: It all began with legendary mermaids, real or not. Dating from the 1850s, the Mermaid house was present on the peninsula when building began at Portmeirion. For many years it was used to house village staff. Williams-Ellis dressed up the cottage with an imposing metal canopy and the welcoming palm trees sprinkled throughout the village. Landscape design and Italianate architecture weave the illusion that we are in sunny Italy instead of wet and windy North Wales. An Italian Resort in Northern Wales Portmeirion village in Minffordd has become a destination vacation and event venue in northern Wales. It has accommodations, cafes, and weddings all within a Disney-esque community. Vacationing within a fanciful planned community was big business in the 1960s after the success of Californias Disneyland in 1955 and before the 1971 opening of Floridas Walt Disney World Resort. Williams-Ellis idea of fantasy took on a more Italianate tone than Disneys mousechitecture, however. The vacation village nestles on the northern coast of Wales, but theres nothing Welsh in the flavor of its architecture. No stone cottages here. Instead, the hillside overlooking the bay is dotted with candy-colored houses suggesting sunny Mediterranean landscapes. There are even swaying palm trees around the tinkling fountains. The Unicorn Cottage, for example, was a British-Italian experience in the Welsh countryside. P A Thompson / Getty Images Viewers of the 1960s television series The Prisoner should find some of the landscapes eerily familiar. The bizarre prison kingdom where actor Patrick McGoohan encountered surreal adventures was, in fact, Portmeirion. Environmentalism The flamboyant and largely self-taught Williams-Ellis devoted his life to the cause of environmental preservation. In 1926, he founded the Council for the Protection of Rural England. He established the Campaign for the Protection of Rural Wales in 1928. Forever the conservationist, Williams-Ellis helped establish the British National Parks in 1945, and in 1947 he penned On Trust for the Nation for the National Trust. He was knighted in 1972 for services to architecture and the environment. Williams-Ellis, today recognized as one of the U.K.s first conservationists, wanted to show that the development of a naturally beautiful site need not lead to its defilement. His lifelong concern was environmental preservation, and by building Portmeirion on his private peninsula in Snowdonia, Williams-Ellis hoped to show that architecture can be beautiful and fun without defacing the landscape. The resort became an exercise in historic restoration. Many of the structures were pieced together from buildings destined for demolition. The village became known as a repository for fallen architecture. Williams-Ellis didnt mind when visitors called his quirky village a home for fallen buildings. Despite these high-minded intentions, however, Portmeirion is, most of all, entertaining. Death He died at his home in Plas Brondanw on April 8, 1978. Legacy Architect Williams-Ellis moved amongst artists and artisans. He married the writer Amabel Strachey and fathered the artist/potter Susan Williams-Ellis, the originator of Portmeirion Botanic Garden dinnerware. Since 2012, Portmeirion has been the site of an arts and music festival called Festival No6, named after the main character in The Prisoner. For one long, exhausting weekend in early September, Sir Cloughs village is home to the quirky fringe who seeks poetry, harmony, and a Mediterranean refuge in northern Wales. Festival No6 is billed as a festival unlike any other, no doubt because the fanciful Welsh village is itself a fantasy. On television, the sense of geographical and temporal displacement suggests that this village was created by a madman. But there was nothing crazy about Portmeirions designer, Sir Clough Williams-Ellis. Sources â€Å"Experience the Magic.† Portmeirion Village Holiday Resort North Wales, Portmeirion Ltd., 2019.â€Å"Sir Richard Clough – ‘The Most Complete Man.’† Local Legends, BBC.â€Å"Snowdon Summit Centre Hits the Peak of Success.† WalesOnline, Media Wales Ltd., 28 Mar. 2013.

Saturday, December 21, 2019

Photography Its Evolution and Effects on the World Essay

One of the universal languages of the world may be a one that would not normally come to mind, and that is photography. People all over the world can understand it, whether they speak English or something else. Since the beginning, man has striven to leave his mark on the world, be it caves drawings, sketches, or paintings. The art of photography has evolved in many ways, such as the different materials that were used, the ways to develop a picture, a camera’s size and portability, and how the camera has advanced in its technology and physical features. Photography also has a huge effect on the world both globally and individually. It was during the time of Aristotle that an invention called the camera obscura came about. It could be†¦show more content†¦Another Frenchman by the name of Louis Jacques Mandà © Daguerre caught wind of Nià ©pce’s accomplishment, and after writing Nià ©pce a letter that suggested an exchange of information, Daguerre and Nià ©pce became partners by 1829. Daguerre was soon on his own, though, for his partner died in 1833. Daguerre moved on develop the notion of the modern day dark room, a room used to Daguerre perfected a new process of making an image permanent, and made it known to the world as the daguerreotype. The daguerreotype immediately became famous. It used a â€Å"highly polished surface of silver that was plated on a copper sheet.† The process reduced the exposure time from a rather lengthy time of eight hours. The image that was produced was extremely detailed and exciting to look at, but despite its popularity, the daguerreotype was in fact a t echnological dead end, as there was no way for the photographs to be duplicated from a single negative. In June of 1840, an English scientist named William Henry Fox Talbot announced a technique that used highly light-sensitive paper. First, after exposure, the paper would appear completely blank. To make the image visible, silver iodide had to be used. 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Friday, December 13, 2019

The Wounded Platoon Free Essays

Being currently in the military I have mixed reactions when viewing this video. I perform the same role as â€Å"Doc† Krebs did, but for the Air Force Reserve. There Is a lot to consider when discussing this documentary. We will write a custom essay sample on The Wounded Platoon or any similar topic only for you Order Now It was well constructed In the sense that those interviewed held various positions representing nearly every step of the larger process that is the war. First I would like to discuss the issue of battle itself. Few of our nation’s military actually sees combat, it is largely support for those who do. Of those who are placed In a combat situation the number of those is sustained combat day after day Is even fewer. Infantry during an offensive tactical plan are typically those who have suffered the worst. To make matters worse this particular war is extremely taxing of a person’s psyche. Unlike most wars of the past the enemy is not readily identifiable. They wear no uniforms they blend in with the population. Threatening the locals into keeping quiet about which buildings they are in is not uncommon. It is no wonder that returning soldiers are scanning rooftops or firing at the first male they see viewing the site of an explosion. Who Is to say they didn’t set It off? Often the explosion from an DIED Is the first wave of an oncoming attack and the gunfire is not far behind. It is easy to say that they should know better sitting on your couch watching this video. But nine months into a deployment especially one where you are on the offensive, not all people are strong enough to know the difference in that split second. The truth is we will never know. Many of the soldiers Interviewed trace the root of their problems back to the death of SST Huh. This was the first of many multiple traumas they encountered. They ere not yet numb to the effects of war. Numbness In itself Is a survival mechanism; as mentioned by a troop in the video, that is necessary to perform at the level needed. In that instant it’s kill or be killed, nothing else matters. It also was especially tragic since the SST that was killed was so well respected and liked. Some of the members did seek help and this is where we get our first glimpse of the larger problem. The speech given by George Bush sending an additional ASK troops Into battle sets off a chain reaction. There are only 25% of young people In this nation that are insider â€Å"fit† to join the military. This is due to a number of reasons such as weight, fitness level, health status, previous surgeries and intelligence level to name a few. It also takes a considerable amount of time from the start of a recruit signing the papers to get them to basic training, which can take months in itself. Then they must be able to complete that successfully and move on and successfully complete their lob specific training. There Is additional training specific to the region and special tactics that also must be completed before a member is even eligible to deploy. That is even if they are infantry as previously mentioned, most of the military does not perform that role. So this brings us to the decisions made by the top level command. Does the military typically allow criminals? No. Do they allow those with pending charges to deploy? No. Do they allow those who are mentally unstable to deploy without first getting treatment? No. Until this war they didn’t allow All of these factors security threat overseas, and it worked. A multitude of factors that will forever remain unknown to everyone except the few who made the rules and we will fully know what he rational was. With that being said when the president says you must send this many men, you do. In an ideal world there would be enough to go around. Sure they could have pulled from another base. But what the video doesn’t address is anyone else’s deployment cycle. This platoon was Just one of many in the same situation. Do you send someone over to Iraq for another year 2 months after they have been reunited with their family? The general population and the vast majority of the military itself do not know the manning of the force or who is actually eligible to deploy out of those who are in. It is certainly a tough call to make. I’m certain that those who made it knew that there would be a downfall in some regard. In this case it is the medical system. The onset of this year we Just completed, has saw a tremendous surge in life- changing injuries and service connected disabilities. As mentioned in the video it is an abnormal situation to be placed in. Many of those who were shown in the video were deemed unfit for continued military service following their deployment, specifically for PETS. A diagnosis of PETS cannot be made initially after a traumatic vent, the symptoms must be present for several months and disrupt daily functioning. Irritability, a sense of being on guard, short temper, easily startled and nightmares are some of a plethora of symptoms experienced. Access to care is another shortfall mentioned in this video. Some of the soldiers did not seek treatment due to stigma. Others such as Nash sought treatment too late after he had resorted to drugs and alcohol first. I will say that the military did fail them in the sense of the initial treatment. I wish I knew why this was the case. I can only speculate that it is due to not being fully aware of the tuition, money and a lack of available resources to treat these members. This brings us to another failure not mentioned in the video. It is unclear what role the soldiers next in their chain of command (direct supervisor) played in this process. They could have advocated for the member, but more importantly they could have simply been there and stuck with them through every aspect of their treatment giving them support at every turn. It is impossible to tell from the video if an attempt was made and the supervisor was shut out, or if one of these men portrayed was the supervisor of the others. That is how the leadership system broke down. There is absolutely no way that the commander is responsible directly. Commanders are only informed of a patient seeking mental health treatment and they follow the recommendations given by those who actually evaluated the patient. They are given zero information on the diagnosis. Secondly they would be completely unaware of their subordinates behavior off duty. The failure of the mental health system in the military is not surprising. The VA system is shambles and has been before the influx of patients since the onset of this ar. Staffing and overcrowding is commonplace, at least it would appear the federal government cannot turn a blind eye anymore and is addressing this issue. The mental health system has strict rules about duty limitations and determines who is eligible for continued service based on condition but it is obvious in this case they if this process was started on these members as it can take months for a member to be considered at maximal medical improvement. It is only at this point after the government has done everything in their power to aid the member that they can aka the decision to retain or discharge the individual. They simply may not have had the time, or the member may have forced leadership’s hand by committing other faults such as felonies as evidenced in the video. It is certainly disheartening to see our military portrayed in this fashion although for some it is a reality. Despite what is shown in this video I feel that our mental health in the US military is performing better than ever before and operates at a high level. Certainly they could use more resources and staff but that cost money that may not be slotted for this particular concern. Budget drives every action in Washington and sometimes it takes a crisis before those who serve us will listen. It will take years to rectify the VA system, and there will also be problems and people lost in the system as they try to seek help as they are exiting the military by choice or otherwise. I am proud to serve in the military and help those who are wounded, physically or psychologically and will continue to do so. You must have faith that those above you are making the best and most informed decisions they can, even though you will never understand the factors that went into such a decision. How to cite The Wounded Platoon, Papers

Thursday, December 5, 2019

Black Death (1096 words) Essay Example For Students

Black Death (1096 words) Essay Black DeathCantor states that, No one peasant or aristocrat was safe from the disease, and once it was contracted, a horrible and painful death wasalmost a certainty. The dead and the dying lay in the streets abandoned byfrightened friends and relatives (482). This certainly paints an accurate andhorrifying picture of the fourteenth century during the plague. The bubonicplague, also known as the Black Death or The Plague, (Hindley 103) was one ofthe major scourges of the Middle Ages. It killed indiscriminately withoutremorse or thought of consequences. Because the plague was so widespread,theories about causes, blame and a variety of supposed cures abounded. Most ofthese were without basis or fact and relied on myths and rumors. Theories forthe causes and blames came from ignorance and hate, two horrible things marriedby fear. Some of the cures were not much better than the plague itself. Theplague was transmitted to humans by fleas from infected rats that nested inpeoples roofs (M atthew 154). Fourteenth century man had no concept of how thedisease was spread or how it could be stopped. The plague was transmitted towestern Europe from China along trade routes (Matthew 154). Once the plague hadreached the coast of Europe, it was soon transmitted to the countryside throughthe commercial trade networks (Matthew 154). The first cases of the plagueoccurred in a European colony called Genoa (Blum, Cameron and Barnes 38). It wasbesieged in 1347 by mongols, who flung plague riddled bodies overthe walls of Genoa. This was considered an early form of biologicalwarfare (Blum, Cameron and Barnes 38). According to Matthews,Experts could do nothing to cure or explain the plague (154). Thepeople of this period had no idea what they were dealing with. Even if they hadknown what caused the plague, their medical technology was almost nonexistent,so they could not have invented a cure (Matthew 154). Though the doctors of thetime were unable to cure the disease, or even explain it, they did observe itssymptoms and try to supply theories of the plagues cause (Matthew 154-5). People were aware that if you came in contact with the sick or their belongings(clothing, bedding, etc) you would soon be afflicted with the disease (Herlihy353). Medieval man also knew that animals could catch the disease from apersons material possessions (Herlihy 353) but they never realized they couldcatch the plague from animals. There were three main theories about why theplague had stricken an area. The first is a corrupted atmosphere orbad air, the second was the alignment of the planets, and the third the wrath ofGod (Ziegler 3). Some people said there were clouds that carried the plague(Ziegler 3-4). Others believed that it was a cloud made from steam that hadrisen from dead fish (Ziegler 4). Some believed that the placement of theplanets was the cause of the plague (Ziegler 25). The medical department at theUniversity of Paris told Phillip VI in a report in 1348, that the alignment ofSaturn, Jupiter and Mars on March 20, 1345 was the cause of the plague (Ziegler25). A popu lar theory was that the plague was the wrath of God. This wassupposedly brought on by sins (Bartel 62). Some sins were worse than others suchas lust, pride, whoredom (Bartel 62). There were also othertheories. The Scottish people thought that the English were being punished forthe terrible things they had done to the Scots in the past. So the Scots invadedEngland while it was weak, laughing at their enemies, until they,too, fell prey to the disease (Ziegler 159). The Jewish people were also blamedfor the spread of the disease. Thousands of Jews were murdered as scapegoats(Ziegler 80). Many supposed cures arose in response to the plague. Some believedthat if they lived moderately, consumed the most delicate foods and wines, andabstained from sex, that their resistance to the plague would be higher (Herlihy354). There were others that believed the exact opposite. They believed inheavy drinking, and lots of cheer andsinging (Herlihy 354) to keep them safe. Still others chose to livethe ir lives at an even keel, not too moderate, not too heavy (Herlihy 354). InRowlings Everyday Life of Medieval travellers, she states that Flightbecame increasingly one of the commonest means adopted to escape from thisdreaded disease (118). People also believed that if you burned fires, withstinkpots filled with various herbs and other natural ingredients,that it would correct the infectious air (Bartel 53). Perfumes madefrom roots and oils was another popular cure that individuals used to clean theair (Bartel 54). According to Bartel, an internal cure was to take garlicwith, butter, a clove, two or three, according as it shall agree with theirbodies (54). Some doctors believed that pure water mixed with agreat deal of salt was a cure (Bartel 55). Royalty got into the cure game withthe Kings Majestys Excellent Receipt for the Plague and adrink for the plague prepared by Lord Bacon, and approved by QueenElizabeth (Bartel 55). There were others called flagellants that walkedthe roads whipping themselves to ward off the plague (Wright 153). The realityaccording to Herlihy was that, In the cure of these illnesses, neither theadvice of a doctor nor the power of any medicine appeared to help and to do anygood (353). The Black Death killed about a third of Europes population. .u34b0d41a5f03d95cfd3d119b120df939 , .u34b0d41a5f03d95cfd3d119b120df939 .postImageUrl , .u34b0d41a5f03d95cfd3d119b120df939 .centered-text-area { min-height: 80px; position: relative; } .u34b0d41a5f03d95cfd3d119b120df939 , .u34b0d41a5f03d95cfd3d119b120df939:hover , .u34b0d41a5f03d95cfd3d119b120df939:visited , .u34b0d41a5f03d95cfd3d119b120df939:active { border:0!important; } .u34b0d41a5f03d95cfd3d119b120df939 .clearfix:after { content: ""; display: table; clear: both; } .u34b0d41a5f03d95cfd3d119b120df939 { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #95A5A6; } .u34b0d41a5f03d95cfd3d119b120df939:active , .u34b0d41a5f03d95cfd3d119b120df939:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #2C3E50; } .u34b0d41a5f03d95cfd3d119b120df939 .centered-text-area { width: 100%; position: relative ; } .u34b0d41a5f03d95cfd3d119b120df939 .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #2980B9; font-size: 16px; font-weight: bold; margin: 0; padding: 0; text-decoration: underline; } .u34b0d41a5f03d95cfd3d119b120df939 .postTitle { color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .u34b0d41a5f03d95cfd3d119b120df939 .ctaButton { background-color: #7F8C8D!important; color: #2980B9; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; moz-border-radius: 3px; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; width: 80px; min-height: 80px; background: url(https://artscolumbia.org/wp-content/plugins/intelly-related-posts/assets/images/simple-arrow.png)no-repeat; position: absolute; right: 0; top: 0; } .u34b0d41a5f03d95cfd3d119b120df939:hover .ctaButton { background-color: #34495E!important; } .u34b0d41a5f03d95cfd3d119b120df939 .centered-text { display: table; height: 80px; padding-left : 18px; top: 0; } .u34b0d41a5f03d95cfd3d119b120df939 .u34b0d41a5f03d95cfd3d119b120df939-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 108px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .u34b0d41a5f03d95cfd3d119b120df939:after { content: ""; display: block; clear: both; } READ: Automated customer service EssayThe reign of terror lasted for twenty years in the fourteenth century (Cantor477). This horrible disease killed young and old, rich and poor. The plague knewno boundaries. Today we might think that the beliefs of the fourteenth centurywere barbaric and archaic, but it has only been in the last one hundred yearsthat scientists and doctors have discovered the cause of the bubonic plague. Believing that the plague was caused by bad air, the planets positions or theJews or that it could be cured with fire or herbs seemed logical to fourteenthcentury man although it may seem foolish to modern man. BibliographyBartel, Roland, ed. London in Plague and Fire. BostonD.C. Heath and Company,1957. Blum, Jerome, Cameron, Rondo, and Barnes, Thomas G. The European World AHistory. BostonLittle, Brown and Company, 1970. Cantor, Norman. The Civilizationof the Middle Ages. New York HarperCollins Publishers, 1993. Herlihy, David, ed. Medieval Culture and Society. New York Walker and Company, 1968. Hindley,Geoffrey. The Medieval Establishment. New YorkG.P. Putnams Sons, 1970. Matthew,Donald. Atlas of Medieval Europe. New YorkFacts on File, Inc., 1983. Rowling,Marjorie. Everyday Life of Medieval Travellers. LondonB.T. Batsford LTD, 1971. Wright, Esmond, ed. The Medieval and Renaissance World. Secaucus, NJChartwellBooks Inc., 1979. Ziegler, Phillip. The Black Death. Wolfeboro Falls, N.H.AlanSutton Publishing, 1991.